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Sprint Cup Races in Vegas

Denny Hamlin would prove to be the biggest mover on the track today after starting from the back of the field following an engine change and climbing his way to a seventh-place finish to lead Joe Gibbs Racing in today’s NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race at Las Vegas Motor Speedway.

Unfortunately Hamlin’s good fortune did not extend to his teammates as an engine failure left Kyle Busch with a 38th-place finish and a late pit road tire penalty limited Joey Logano to 23rd.

Hamlin qualified the No. 11 FedEx Ground Toyota in the 17th position but had to go to the back of the field to start the race. Often cited for his patience on the track, Hamlin certainly displayed that characteristic today as he methodically worked his way up through the field and into the top ten. Although he gained seven spots over the course of the first seven laps of the race, but Hamlin’s ascent would not always come that fast as the field spread out on green flag runs over the 1.5-mile Las Vegas Speedway. Hamlin continued to climb his way toward the front of the field however and by lap 174 he was closing in on the top ten. Once inside the top ten Hamlin continued to show patience and brought the No. 11 FedEx Ground Camry home with a solid seventh-place effort.

Joey Logano started the No. 20 Home Depot Toyota in the sixth position and quickly proved that his qualifying effort was consistent with the quality of his car. In fact, Logano spent almost the entire day inside the top ten and really much of that racing inside that top six. As the laps wound down it appeared certain the No. 20 Camry would finish in contention for a spot in the top five, but as the teams hit pit road for a final time the Home Depot crew was assessed a tire penalty that would force Logano to serve a pass-through penalty and ultimately leave him a lap off the pace. Although in position for the lucky dog spot, the much needed caution would never come as the race remained green and left Logano with a disappointing 23rd-place finish.

Busch started the No. 18 Snickers Peanut Butter Squared Toyota in the fifth position and was strong through the early going of the race. Unfortunately the first sign of trouble would hit on lap 96 as a blown tire would take him up into the wall. Although he was able to get back out on the track and appeared to have time to overcome the setback, the No. 18 Camry would lose its engine about 20 laps later. With flames shooting from underneath the car, Busch’s day would be over just 107 laps into the 267-lap race, and the Las Vegas native would have to settle for a 38th-place finish.

Edwards captured the victory, with Tony Stewart second, Juan Pablo Montoya third, Marcose Ambrose fourth, and Ryan Newman rounded out the top-five. There were seven cautions for a total of 35 laps and 21 lead changes among 14 different drivers over the course of the 267-lap race.

The NASCAR Sprint Cup Series will take a week off before returning at Bristol Motor Speedway on Sunday, March 20. The race will begin at 1 PM ET with live, high-definition coverage provided by FOX beginning with its pre-race show at Noon ET. The race will also be broadcast live on SIRIUS Satellite Radio Channel 128.

Why Don't NASCAR Tires Have Tread?

The reason NASCAR tires don’t have tread is simple: grip. The tires you find on street cars have tread to provide grip in wet conditions. The tread channels water away from the tire’s contact patch. In fact, NASCAR indeed has a rain tire that is used for the Nationwide Series. If our dry-weather tires (also known as “slicks”) were to have tread it would remove rubber that could otherwise be making contact with the asphalt and provide more grip. Some racing series, such as short-track divisions and Formula 1 purposefully add tread or grooves to their tires to slow cars down in the turns.

If it didn’t rain, your tires wouldn’t have grip either. That’s why it’s very important to keep an eye on the tread-depths and tire wear on your street-car. If you were to hit a wet patch with no tread it could spell disaster!

I’m a NASCAR Tire Specialist

Without the benefit of on-board computers that you’ll find in other racing series, the crew chief of a NASCAR team relies on the feedback provided by a driver when trying to set a car up. In addition to the driver, there is another voice that the crew chief listens to for information on the car’s handling – that of the tire specialist. You won’t believe just how much a tire can tell you about the mood of a race car.
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